Queenstown Airport Proposed Noise Changes

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The key areas of proposed noise changes are:

  • Changes to the Airport's Noise Boundaries
  • Changes to the Airport Designation
  • Changes to the District Plan

To help explain these proposed changes in more detail we've created a summary document and range of supplementary fact sheets. The consultation is now closed however you can view the questions ask by the community below.

View the QAC Proposed Noise Boundaries GIS map online.



The key areas of proposed noise changes are:

  • Changes to the Airport's Noise Boundaries
  • Changes to the Airport Designation
  • Changes to the District Plan

To help explain these proposed changes in more detail we've created a summary document and range of supplementary fact sheets. The consultation is now closed however you can view the questions ask by the community below.

View the QAC Proposed Noise Boundaries GIS map online.


CLOSED: Thank you for your questions. The consultation has now closed however you can view the questions asked by the community below.

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    At the drop in session the Planner advised that the noise generated by each plane taking off and landing would not get any louder but there would be more of them. Now we hear that the larger A321s are about to start coming here. How much louder is each A321 movement in comparison to an A320?

    KatFish asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi there,

    I've just checked with Marshall Day and the A321Neo is quieter than the A320.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    Hi whilst the noise levels are debatable are there any tests on the vibration that hits properties as the aircraft take off particularly heading away from the lake ?

    Laurel asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Laurel,

    I have checked with Marshall Day, the company that monitors the noise, and noise levels have been recorded in several homes there. The low-frequency noise can cause vibration in the buildings and this varies from property to property depending on its construction.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    We believe that making alterations and additions to existing homes a "non-complying" activity (in the DIstrict Plan) within the Air noise zone is highly punitive to the airport's neighbours, as to do anything to their homes (including the QAC mitigation measures) will require a Resource Consent for an activity that is essentially deemed unacceptable. Is QAC likely to offer any compensation to home owners on this? We'd rather see a level of "permitted" activity, say to a certain level of construction specification and to a certain percentage of site coverage. Perhaps beyond this it could be "discretionary". It is proposed that new ASAN (houses) will be "prohibited". We live in one of the many old cribs dating back to the 1950s in old Frankton (essentially undeveloped). Our long term goal is to remove and rebuild, but under this proposal this is not an option, we can only renovate and this will be fraught with challenges through the Resource Consent process. The planner at the drop in session noted that the goal is to not allow additional people to reside in the Noise control zone, but that internal environment will be much more comfortable than external, but we will be required to continue living in a tiny crib that can never have noise mitigation in place to the same level as a new home, and lifestyle based around outdoor living. What about the existing undeveloped sites zoned Low Density Residential? We are concerned about the long term effects on the local neighbourhood from this. Will it just become a run down wasteland? Another huge effect on the local environment? Shouldn't it be the home owner's decision to remain living there in the way they choose?

    KatFish asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi there,

    Thank you for your feedback - I have passed it on to the noise team for consideration as part of the proposal.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    What will be the timeframe for QAC funded noise mitigation measures to be offered to home owners if the change in the noise control boundaries goes ahead? Will it be immediate or does the level of disturbance need to reach a certain level before it is offered?

    KatFish asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi KatFish,

    It would not be immediate, it would be over time as the noise exposure increased. 

    Aircraft noise is independently monitored and modelled to ensure the aircraft operations stay within the airport's noise boundaries and to help with forward planning where noise mitigation might be required. 

    The aircraft noise modelling takes place over a three-month period during the busiest summer and winter months. This means that the noise contours are conservative and show the worst case scenario from the previous year.

    Aircraft noise is also measured and the data is used to calibrate the aircraft noise model and confirm compliance with our designation conditions and the noise boundaries in the District Plan. (The data and modelling is managed independently by leading New Zealand noise management experts Marshall Day Acoustics Ltd.)

    The modelling software is then used to produce maps (known as Annual Aircraft Noise Contours or AANC) to show the previous year’s noise emissions.

    These are then used to predict aircraft noise for the next 12 months.  The projected AANC shows a year in advance where the contour will be. This contour guides QAC’s mitigation programme to ensure we are mitigating houses before the contour reaches them.the testing forms the Annual Aircraft Noise Contours which would indicate where the exposure would be having an effect.  

    I hope that helps?

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    I have just completed your survey, but there isn't any space for general concerns outside of the specific questions. How do we submit other concerns and really have our say outside of a guided survey?

    KatFish asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi there,

    Thanks for getting in touch - you're very welcome to email them to community@queenstownairport.com.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    According to the airports reports passenger numbers have increased from 0.6 million in 2005 to 2 million in 2017. This is a compounding growth rate over 13 years of 9.8%. The current planing period is to 2045. The projected passenger numbers is 5.1 million (3.5%) with restricted growth, or 7 million (4.8%) with unrestricted growth. My question is why the disparity between the historical and projected growth percentages particularly with growth rates of 13% to 18% in recent years?

    JFB asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi JFB,

    We have seen unprecedented growth at the airport over the past few years which we consider to be unsustainable long term.  By sharing our master planning options and noise planning proposal with the community we're hoping to gauge what level of growth is considered sustainable for the district over a 30-year period so that we can manage our growth. At the moment our projections show that we could reach our noise boundaries in the next 3-4 years.   

    Wanaka Airport presents an opportunity to take more of a district-wide view around aviation services and infrastructure, but we need to do the work to determine what could be developed and over what timeframes.  Since taking on the long-term lease in early April, we’ve held workshops with the community to ask what they would like to see for the airport’s future.  Their thoughts and ideas will help inform the master plan for Wanaka Airport which kicks off next month.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    Hi Jen, I have read your printed material and cannot find any reason for increasing the noise boundaries. Why can aircraft not keep within the existing boundaries? If building a new 'NORTH' or 'SOUTH' terminal, why not keep the existing terminal and public parking facilities for light aircraft, helicopter and private jet facilities. It is a bright, modern facilities which provides a warm and welcoming environment for visitors. Proposing to "walk-away" from it gives the appearance of QLDC having no concerns for sensible use of ratepayers money. Thanks, Wayne Christensen

    maryandwayne asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Wayne,

    Thanks for your feedback.  This is the reason we're shared our noise planning work and the master plan options so that we can have a discussion with the community and get feedback.  If a new terminal was built (and these are only options, nothing decided) then the existing terminal could be repurposed. 

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    Hi, I was wondering if the 7am flight to Auckland every day needs to fly over Arrowtown as it really annoys us here. I talked to other Arrowtowners and they all recognize it as a disturbance / noise pollution. I s there any change the flight path could change, please.

    Helga asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Helga,

    Thanks for your feedback, I will certainly pass it on.  

    Aircraft need to land into the wind and take off into the wind so that's why flights change between taking off over the lake or over the Kawarau Gorge.

    The flight paths are determined by Airways (Air Traffic Control) which manages NZ's airspace.  In 2012, Airway introduced SMART approaches for jet operations at Queenstown Airport which all 4 airlines now use.  The SMART approaches use satellite-based navigation and enable aircraft to burn less fuel, emit less carbon dioxide and fly more quietly. These procedures are also designed to reduce noise further out from the airport.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    How can the council/qac make an objective decision re airport growth given the ownership conflict of interest?

    martymonsta asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Marty,

    That's more a question for council but in this instance we are working with them as our regulator.  Many airports are owned or part-owned by local or national governments and there are clear rules around that.

    Warm regards,
    Jen  

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    Why are you pursuing the notion that easier accessibility to Queenstown is good? Do you not care that you are doing the one thing that the rest of the world has already done, namely over populating areas of environmental beauty? What is the underlying motivation behind increasing the number of people having easier and more direct access to Queenstown?

    Berri asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Berri,

    The airport has a responsibility to plan ahead and the forecasting that has been done has indicated the demand and potential growth of the region from both residents and visitors over a 30-year period.  The airport has been in a fairly constant state of development for a long time so, for us, planning is critical.  We need to understand and shape what infrastructure and services are needed at the airport and when, and how they can be funded. 

    We don’t want to lead the conversation about future growth in the district but we do have a responsibility to give the community, our shareholders, airport stakeholders and employees, the business community and the tourism industry a heads-up on future airport pressures and constraints and ask for input. 

    Our projections show that we could reach our noise boundaries in the next 3-4 years, and in planning terms that’s a short timeframe.  

    By sharing the work we’ve done and putting forward a proposal with a suggested long-term number of 5 million passenger movements (approximately 2.5 million residents/visitors) by 2045, it provides a starting point for a conversation which will help us gauge what the community feels is sustainable.

    Many people rely on the airport to connect them with national and international destinations, employ them or support their business or lifestyle.  Many are also concerned by aircraft noise, traffic congestion and pressure on destination infrastructure. We need to try and strike the right balance for everyone involved. 

    It’s also important for all of us to consider what would happen if people want to come to the district but cannot do that by flying here.  Some may not come but others will because they either live here or want to visit.  If the future airport is not in a position to cope with a level of destination demand, we may be just be pushing the issue down the road.  At the moment, about half of the visitors to our region come by car.

    This is only the start of the process and we welcome your feedback.  If you haven't already, I encourage you to fill out the survey on this site.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

     

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    Jen The responses below seem to be an extremely moderated blog. Why don’t you post all responses with some moderation so that the real story and meaningful debate occurs?

    Berri asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Berri,

    Sorry, I'm not sure what you mean - the questions we receive are published along with the response to the question which comes from the noise team. I'm posting the information on their behalf.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    I see that if the changes go ahead for the airport we will be entitilled to having 75% of the cost of a ventalition system put in. Will the airport all so put money towards the power bill to help cover the running of the system? I also find it hard to believe that the system used to predict the new noise boundaries can predict that there is a difference between our house and our neighbours on a clear day considering there is vegetation or other buildings to block the noise?

    Dnb asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi there,

    Once the ventilation system is installed, the householder would be responsible for ongoing maintenance and running costs.  To implement these planning procedures and mitigation offers, we have to draw lines on a map.  The line is calculated as accurately as is technically possible but unfortunately, as with any line, one property might be inside the line and the property next door might be outside.  We know that noise doesn’t stop at a line and that it seems odd to have two properties close together in separate boundaries.  There is a science behind it though.  The airport’s noise boundaries are independently monitored and modelled by independent noise experts and the accuracy of the model and predicted noise boundaries is tested and calibrated by undertaking actual on-site noise measurements to the North, South, East and West of the airport in the busiest winter and summer months.  When a noise contour touches a property it becomes ‘cadastralised’ to take in the boundary around the property so that it is included. This is the reason why one property may be outside a boundary and one might be in. I hope this goes some way to explaining it.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    Can you provide a detailed answer on why the decision was made to close the cross wind runway. This may be more detailed than can be provided in this forum, if so can you direct me to a paper that deals with that assessment and decision. Thanks David

    Liz asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi David,

    The master plan options and proposed noise boundary changes have modelled the phasing out of the cross-wind runway over the next 10 years.  As the main runway becomes busier, and a Code C taxiway is introduced, the cross-wind runway would likely create increased complexity and risk in terms of airfield operations.  There are ongoing discussions with the general aviation community about the potential impacts of this proposed change to the way the airfield operates.

    Warm regards,
    Jen


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    Hi Jen in regards to my second question, I can understand that adding a bedroom would trigger the need for a ventilation system for that space. But the information sheet suggests that any work requiring a building consent, even something quite minor may only get approved on the basis the whole house is upgraded to have a ventilation system. Please clarify if this is the case.

    Matt Barnett asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Matt,

    I've just checked with the planners and the obligation to install a ventilation system only applies to a new extension – the intention is to only capture any new part of the building which is considered a critical listening environment (bedroom, kitchen etc.).  I hope that helps?

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    Why would you not move the whole airport up past Kingston. You are going to destroy the tranquil bliss that makes Queenstown a tourist magnet. Noise pollution is already horrific enough as it is. We are destroying the land with developments, not the sky too.......

    BecSS asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Bec,

    Thanks for your feedback.  As part of the 30-year Master Plan options work for the airport, which was released for community discussion last year, a siting study was done to see what sites could be possible based on the strict criteria required for an airport.  21 sites were looked at with the top 3 being the existing Wanaka Airport and two greenfields sites - one in Hawea and one around Mossburn. Based on the criteria Wanaka Airport was considered the preferred option. If you would like to read more please check out p36-37 of the Master Plan Summary document.

    Warm regards,
    Jen   

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    In your answer to Gillian about numbers of aircraft movements up and down the lake you state that this would be half the 55000. I don't understand the rational for that. Surely 55000 is the number. It maybe that only half of these are takeoffs but the other half would be landings so surely the total movements will still be 55000?? While the jets are less noisy on landing the small planes are just as noisy travelling down the lake to land as they are on take off.

    Liz asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi David,

    I've just responded to Gillian's enquiry - I hope that helps explain it.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    HI Jen I have some confusion about what a movement constitutes. Is a movement a take off and a landing (ie the plane arrives and leaves) or is a movement either a landing or a take off. I cant work out what you are telling me below when you say "half". I have taken my statistics from those numbers you have supplied my to come up with 55441. I have combined scheduled and unscheduled aircraft Cheers Gillian

    Gillian Macleod asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Gillian,

    Thanks for your query and sorry for any confusion.

    One movement is either an Arrival or a Departure.  There are a total 54441 fixed wing movements.

    Operationally, aircraft take off or land into the wind.  So when there is a westerly wind aircraft would take off over the lake, but they would land from the other end; over the river.  Conversely, if there was an easterly wind, aircraft would land over the lake, but depart over the river.

    This means that generally only half the movements (arrivals or departures) on any day would be over the lake, the other half would be over the river.  There are occasions where the wind will shift, and that means from that point onwards the aircraft operations would also shift, but this change would only cause a very small change in the number going over the lake versus over the river.

    With respect to where the noise levels are calculated, they are calculated at ground level, taking into account the terrain.  So over the water the calculation is  done at lake level, but over the land, the calculation is done at land level, whether that is close to the lake or at a higher elevation.  Therefore the calculations at your house would not be done at lake level, but at your house level.

    I hope that's helpful.

    Warm regards,
    Jen


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    1/. What sort of minimum standard construction would be considered acceptable for properties in Shotover Country within the proposed OCB. I refer to table 4 of Section 12 - Special Zones (Shotover Country) page 12-313 which was a minimum standard in the existing zone, not accounting for the proposed increased noise levels. 2/. The Shotover Country spec sheet notes it is likely that any adjustments to an existing house requiring building consent will trigger the requirement to add a ventilation system. Has the airport sought any typical costing for retrofitting an approved ventilation system? 3/. The proposed new OCB encroaches on the new school in Shotover Country, what reduction in proposed additional flights would be required for the boundary to fall short of the school? 4/. Will there be, or are there already any instruments in place to monitor aircraft noise to see if the dB levels are adhered to? Thanks, Matt

    Matt Barnett asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Matt,

    Thanks very much for getting in touch.  I hope the answers below are helpful.

    1/. In most situations, a typical modern house construction with windows closed would be acceptable for properties in Shotover Country within the proposed OCB (in some rare situations a new house there might even meet the acoustic standards with open windows).  These houses would need to have ventilation to meet the specified ventilation standards as the windows need to be closed to meet the acoustic standard.

    2/.  If a bedroom was added in Shotover Country it would need to have a ventilation/heat pump system for that room.  Costs would likely be in the order of $5k to $7k.

    3/.  For the OCB to fall short of the new school in Shotover Country the number of flights would need to be cut back by about 20%.  This would result in a reduction in noise of approximately 1dB which is an imperceptible change in noise level.

    4/.  QAC is required to submit an annual report to show that the noise limits are being complied with.  This requirement includes a certain amount of noise measuring and noise calculations, both of which are being fulfilled.  The monitoring, data and modelling is managed independently by leading New Zealand noise management experts Marshall Day Acoustics Ltd.

    Warm regards,
    Jen




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    Has moving the Airport to the Kingston area been considered ? I feel we can't stop growth. My thoughts in the feedback is based on moving the airport. Excessive noise will drive people away. If Kingston is not suitable, Develop Invercargill and rapid rail from there.

    Tony asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi there,

    Yes, a siting study was completed as part of the 30-year Master Plan options work which we released for community discussion last year.  21 sites around the region were evaluated via various criteria and dismissed as not appropriate.  Two sites were shortlisted but Wanaka Airport came out the best in terms of a complementary site.  If you'd like some more detail please check out our Master Plan summary document (p36-37). https://our.queenstownairport.com/master-plan 

    Warm regards,
    Jen 

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    Hi Jen so can you confirm that the total scheduled and unscheduled flights up and down the lake will be 55441. Can you explain the flight path of helicopters and how their movements are allocated to the noise boundaries. Can you tell me at what level above the lake level the sound boundary shown on the 2d map and have you other data for all other levels above the lake? ie a 3d model of sound. thanks Gillian

    Gillian Macleod asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Gillian,

    My apologies for the delay in responding regarding this question - I have been checking with our noise experts.  

    Only half of the total number of movements would travel up and down the lake, irrespective of the runway used.  There may be a limited number of times when a runway switch would mean there would be a higher number than this, but would still have a limited impact of only a handful of flights on any given day.

    In terms of helicopter noise, this is included in the same way as fixed wing noise and contributes to the cumulative noise level at each receiver location.  They do fly their own discreet flight tracks from their hangar locations.  These tracks and locations were determined by aviation experts, based on existing flight track usage, future demand and in consultation with operators.

    The noise model Marshall Day has used is 3D in nature and takes account of the terrain.  The noise levels are predicted for receivers at ground level, so they do not predict noise levels at lots of other heights above the lake.  The general approach to environmental noise modelling is to predict noise levels where there is relevant noise exposure.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    I believe the key to all of this for a majority of locals is will non airport infrastructure (eg roading etc etc) keep up with the growth of the airport. How will the airport contribute to local infrastructure like roading moving forward?

    digitdion asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi there,

    Yes in order for growth to be sustainable, it is important for destination infrastructure to keep pace.  We have been working with QLDC and local, regional and national agencies to share datasets and plans and work on ways to help manage the effects of growth. With regard to transport initiatives, we are part of the Regional Transport Governance Group with QLDC, ORC and NZTA and have been working together for the past 18 months on various short, medium and long-term solutions. To date these have included working on the $2 bus, airport park and ride, parking enforcement around Frankton, Hawthorne Drive and the bridge. 

    Regarding contributions, the airport is classed as a Council-Controlled Trading Organisation so we pay a dividend to our shareholders twice a year (QLDC is the majority shareholder).  Last year the dividend equated to $5.4 million returned to the Queenstown Lakes District community. 

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    Hi Jen someone has said to me that this could equate to one aircraft every three minutes. Can you give me accurate information regarding a figure? thanks Gillian

    Gillian Macleod asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Gillian, 

    On p7 of the Proposed Noise Changes summary document you’ll find the 30-year forecasts and on p9 these have been translated into what that could mean in terms of aircraft movements.  During a peak hour today we have an average of 11 movements (take-offs and landings) which equates to one movement about every 6 minutes.  During a peak hour at the end of the 30-year period this could potentially increase to 16 movements or about one movement every 4 minutes.  While this is not a significant increase over an hour, there would likely be more busy hours in a day.  It is also important to understand that this is not representative of aircraft traffic for the full year as the airport still expects to have quieter months or days throughout the year.

    Warm regards,
    Jen


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    How is the new outer noise boundary worked out? When a plane fly's by at what level decibels should the cut off be.

    jamin asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi there,

    Noise modelling software predicts aircraft noise levels in line with New Zealand Standard (NZS 6805:1992). The noise levels are calculated by summing all the aircraft noise over a 24-hour period.  If more planes fly, the overall noise goes up - if quieter planes fly, the overall noise level goes down.  The overall noise level is plotted in the form of equal noise contours and are fixed as Noise Boundaries in the District Plan, shown on the Planning Maps.

    The predictions are based on a future level of airport activity that includes a certain amount of growth (see p7 and p9 of the Proposed Noise Changes summary document). If our proposal was accepted then the amount of noise the airport could make would therefore be fixed at this amount.

    The monitoring and modelling of Queenstown Airport’s aircraft noise is managed independently by leading New Zealand noise management experts Marshall Day Acoustics Ltd who modify compliance with our designation conditions and the noise boundaries.  The computer modelling is calibrated by taking actual on-site noise measurements to the North, South, East and West of the airport.  We then use modelling software to produce maps (known as Annual Aircraft Noise Contours) which show the previous year’s noise results. These are used to predict aircraft noise for the next 12 months which are used to determine offers of noise mitigation when the noise gets above 60dB Ldn.

    Warm regards,
    Jen


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    Hi Jen Can you supply a summary of the community feedback from the consultation of the masterplan thanks Gillian

    Gillian Macleod asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Gillian,

    Sure, you can find a summary of the community feedback in the Master Plan section of the website under Community Feedback and also in the Document Library.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    Does the growth plan include closing the cross wind runaway to allow all small plane and helicopter activity to use the main runway ? Do you have the proportion of passengers who are travelling to Wanaka, Cromwell and Alexandra areas ? If so, what is the projected growth of this market sector ? How many properties located in the inner noise zone does the QAC currently own ?

    Liz asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi there,

    The Master Plan options we released last year have built in the phasing out of the cross-wind runway over time and the ability for fixed wing general aviation aircraft to use the main runway.
    With regard to the proportion of passengers travelling to Wanaka and Central, here is the current annual data we have:
    Domestic: 35% travelled to Wanaka and 20% travelled to Central Otago
    International: 28% travelled to Wanaka and 11% travelled to Central Otago

    QAC owns 5 properties in the current Air Noise Boundary.

    Warm regards,
    Jen
     

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    Hi Jen Is there some 3d modelling that demonstrates how the sound reverberates around the walls of the lake? at what datum are the noise boundaries drawn. As I cant imagine those lines work for all datum levels. Regards Gillian

    Gillian Macleod asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Gillian,

    The noise modelling carried out by Marshall Day Acoustics is done in 3D.  The Integrated Noise Model uses the 3D digital terrain map for the area and thus calculates the aircraft noise level for receivers at ground level taking into account the altitude of the ground at each location. 

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    HI Jen can you supply a breakdown of the movements of helicopter movements as a separate number from the non scheduled air movements both current and proposed. Thanks Gillian

    Gillian Macleod asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Gillian, 

    Sure, there are the numbers for the 5.1mppa (5dB) Planning Scenario:

    Commercial Aircraft = 41,611

    Fixed Wing Aircraft = 11,824

    Helicopters = 33,974

    Corporate Jet = 1,006

    TOTAL AIRCRAFT MOVEMENTS = 88,415

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    HI Jen Can you please confirm that al lair traffic movements apart from helicopter movements,scheduled and non scheduled will be re directed to the single runway? thanks Gillian

    Gillian Macleod asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Gillian, 

    The Master Plan options we released last year have built in the phasing out of the cross-wind runway over time and the ability for fixed wing general aviation aircraft to use the main runway. 

    Warm regards,
    Jen


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    Hi Jen is there any information on the increased emissions and pollution from the proposed increased traffic movements, and the effects on the surrounding people and the lake? regards Gillian

    Gillian Macleod asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Gillian,

    In accordance with the RMA we are preparing an assessment of environmental effects report in relation to the proposal to increase aircraft noise (note: the Regional Air Plan for Otago permits discharges from vehicles and aircraft using airports so this report does not need to account for increased emissions from these sources).  The report will form part of the proposal we put forward to Council seeking to vary the district plan and be publicly available.  The council will then consider the proposal and, if accepted, a formal planning process will commence.  This will include the opportunity to lodge a submission which will be heard at a formal hearing. 
    We’re really keen to hear the community’s views now as it will help us shape the proposal that goes forward to Council.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    Hi - The map legend on the Shotover Country Zone factsheet (Factsheet_8_SCZ_web-ready.pdf) is illegible (image compressed too much and too low resolution). Can you update or point me in the direction of a higher resolution copy? Thanks GC

    GC asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi GC,

    Thanks for your feedback and I'm sorry that the map is difficult to read.  Would you mind sending me your email address and I can email you a higher res copy?  Or if you want to zoom in on a map you could try the interactive GIS one we have at www.queenstownairport.com/GISmap?

    Warm regards,
    Jen 

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    Dear Jen the interactive map you have shown to nick does not seem to be active. Can you resend the link?

    Gillian Macleod asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Gillian, 

    Sure, it should be www.queenstownairport.com/GISmap.

    Warm regards,

    Jen

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    Further to my last question I note that in your Noise document you say; "Based on demand forecasts, we could reach 41,600 scheduled aircraft movements (or approximately 5.1 million passenger movements) per annum by 2031 but are planning to manage growth so that it will be realised by 2045." Can you please advise how you "are planning to manage growth". I cannot see anywhere in the documents where that is set out, even though it is an absolute key to the assumptions on which the whole noise planning process is based . Thanks Nick

    nick12 asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Nick,

    Sure, we can help manage growth and its effects in a number of ways. These are outlined on page 10 of the summary document and include long term planning, working with airlines and managing flight schedules (we are a slot co-ordinated airport which means airlines book slots to arrive and depart), our noise mitigation programme, securing land to relocate general aviation away from Frankton neighbours, a fly neighbourly programme, working with partners like QLDC, NZTA and ORC on transport initiatives, and looking at opportunities to develop Wanaka Airport.

    Warm regards,
    Jen

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    Hi, is there a plan available illustrating the current noise boundaries with the proposed noise boundaries overlaid, for comparison?

    qtl asked almost 2 years ago

    Hi Nick,

    Yes absolutely - it's on page 14 of the Proposed Noise Summary document.  The document is downloadable from our.queenstownairport.com and printed copies are available from the Airport Infodesk, the Events Centre and the Council building in Gorge Rd.  We also have an interactive map available at www.queenstownairport.com/GISmap.  This might be easier to view/zoom?  You can type in your address and it will show you where you sit in the current and proposed boundaries.

    Warm regards,
    Jen