Queenstown Airport Proposed Noise Changes

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The key areas of proposed noise changes are:

  • Changes to the Airport's Noise Boundaries
  • Changes to the Airport Designation
  • Changes to the District Plan

To help explain these proposed changes in more detail we've created a summary document and range of supplementary fact sheets. The consultation is now closed however you can view the questions ask by the community below.

View the QAC Proposed Noise Boundaries GIS map online.



The key areas of proposed noise changes are:

  • Changes to the Airport's Noise Boundaries
  • Changes to the Airport Designation
  • Changes to the District Plan

To help explain these proposed changes in more detail we've created a summary document and range of supplementary fact sheets. The consultation is now closed however you can view the questions ask by the community below.

View the QAC Proposed Noise Boundaries GIS map online.


  • Proposed noise boundary changes realigned with other planning work

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    almost 2 years ago

    After considering community and stakeholder feedback regarding its proposed changes to Queenstown Airport’s noise boundaries, Queenstown Airport Corporation (QAC) will advance its Wanaka Airport master plan work and consider other key long-term planning initiatives before progressing its noise change proposal to the next stage.

    QAC received nearly 1,500 online survey responses as well as 19 individual and group submissions during its five-week public consultation on the proposed noise changes. The consultation followed six months of extensive stakeholder discussions at a local, regional and national level.

    QAC Chief Executive Colin Keel said that the company felt a strong responsibility to consider all viewpoints shared in the consultation process and strike the right balance between creating a sustainable platform for the long-term growth of air services to the region and the effects of such growth on its communities.

    “The consultation process on the proposed noise changes has provided the community, airport stakeholders and others with an opportunity to engage with QAC and share their views. We’ve received invaluable feedback which we will continue to consider as we formulate a way forward and plan for future infrastructure requirements.”

    Mr Keel said that it was clear from the public consultation that many people linked the potential of increased airport activity to the wider questions around regional growth.

    “We are mindful that Queenstown Airport is only one part of the wider picture and our consultation should not lead this important discussion on future growth.

    “For this reason, it’s prudent to integrate our planning with others who have initiatives currently underway. We will factor in considerations for Wanaka Airport in order to form a more comprehensive picture of the dual airport approach as well as strategic planning by other regional and national organisations, particularly Queenstown Lakes District Council. This approach should assist in providing a more informed view on a desired and sustainable level of growth and development for our district,” he said.

    QAC has recently shared its response to the consultation feedback with the Mayor and the Queenstown Lakes District Council. Other key stakeholders, including minority shareholder Auckland International Airport, have also been briefed and support the position.

    All responses received by QAC during the public consultation are now available. Personal details have been removed as appropriate to protect the privacy of individuals.


  • Community and stakeholders thanked for feedback on proposed noise changes

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    almost 2 years ago

    Queenstown Airport has thanked the community and key stakeholders for their participation in the airport’s recent public consultation on its proposed noise changes, which closed on 20 August.

    “We wanted to hear people’s views on our proposed noise changes and are very pleased with the level of feedback,” said Chief Executive Colin Keel.

    “We appreciate the effort put in by everyone who came to our information sessions, engaged with us online and provided us with direct written feedback.

    “We are currently working through nearly 1,500 online survey responses as well as a number of written individual and group responses. Given the extent of the feedback and the need to consider all the comments, we will come back with our thoughts within the next few weeks. The feedback will be made public at that time, although key personal details will be removed to protect the privacy of individuals.”

    Mr Keel says that the consultation also triggered a broader discussion around growth and the role of tourism in Queenstown and across the district.

    “We have engaged in many discussions about growth, the pressures on local infrastructure and the impact of increased visitor numbers.

    “Growth is an important topic of discussion and we’re mindful that Queenstown Airport is only one part of that equation. We don’t want to lead the conversation about future growth in the district – the objective of our public consultation on the proposed noise changes was to give the community, airport stakeholders and employees, the business community and the tourism industry meaningful information on a significant airport constraint and seek their input.”

    Queenstown Airport’s proposed noise changes would enable long-term operational capacity and accommodate a level of forecast passenger growth at the airport. Equally important is the ability to meet demand in the medium-term given the projections that the current noise boundaries are likely to be reached in the next 3-4 years.

    “Many people rely on the airport to connect them with national and international destinations, employ them or support their business or lifestyle. Many are also concerned by aircraft noise, traffic congestion and pressures on local infrastructure. We feel a strong responsibility to consider all viewpoints and try to strike the right balance for everyone involved," said Mr Keel.